Blog

An open platform for new thinking, with recent articles from James Boyce, Lynn Parramore, Darrick Hamilton, and Institute Staff.

Carbon Dividends: The Bipartisan Key to Climate Policy?

The practical question in Washington today is not whether regulations will go, but whether anything will replace them Read more

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America is Regressing into a Developing Nation for Most People

A new book by economist Peter Temin finds that the U.S. is no longer one country, but dividing into two separate economic and political worlds Read more

Debating Household Debt

INET grantee JW Mason has been engaged in an important debate with the Financial Times’ Matthew Klein over the relationship of household debt to income inequality Read more

Meaningful Work: A Radical Proposal

To mark International Women’s Day, Neva Goodwin argues that the crisis of income insecurity and longstanding gender inequality require a form of universal basic income that recognizes and rewards the value of household labor Read more

At Sea Without an Anchor

A presentation from The Economics of Post-Factual Democracy, the first annual conference of The Center for Information and Bubble Studies (CIBS) at The University of Copenhagen Read more

Jayadev: TPP is Dead, but its Legacy Lives On

Institute scholar Arjun Jayadev argues that while TPP is dead, its damaging legacy on intellectual property rights is likely to shape future bilateral trade agreements Read more

The Economics of the Affordable Care Act

Any effort to replace the Affordable Care Act will be confronted by the same structural imbalances in the health care economy that the legislation’s authors faced Read more

Inequality in the United States: A Darkening Horizon

Institute for New Economic Thinking-backed research into inequality explores how taxes and government policy have contributed to deepening economic inequality    Read more

Contemplating the Age of Hyper-Uncertainty

In the 40th anniversary year of John Kenneth Galbraith’s Age of Uncertainty, the 1970s look remarkably stable in comparison with today’s turbulent world  Read more