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Daniele Girardi

Daniele Girardi is assistant professor of Economics at UMass Amherst. His main research interest is the application of explicit and credible research designs for the identification of causal effects in macroeconomics. He is applying this approach in two main research projects. The first investigates the long-run effects of aggregate demand dynamics. The second studies the effect of institutional/political factors on macroeconomic outcomes. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of Siena (Italy) in 2016, with a thesis on aggregate investment which was awarded the “Pierangelo Garegnani” Thesis Prize 2016. 

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Persistent Effects of Autonomous Demand Expansions

Paper Conference paper | | Dec 2017

The prevailing wisdom that aggregate demand ‘shocks’ determine short-run cyclical fluctuations around a supply-determined equilibrium growth rate and an associated equilibrium unemployment rate (or NAIRU) has been called into question by various streams of literature in the last decades. Specifically, a recently revived literature on hysteresis finds significant persistence in the effects of recessions and negative aggregate demand shocks (Blanchard et al. 2015; Martin et al. 2015).

Persistent Effects of Autonomous Demand Expansions

Paper Conference paper | | Oct 2017

This paper aims to assess such tendency to return to a supply-determined potential output, independent of aggregate demand, after episodes of demand expansion.

Featuring this expert

Secular Stagnation: An Event with Larry Summers Is Slow Growth the “New Normal”? If So, What Are the Policy Solutions?

Event Conference | Hosted by Secular Stagnation Project | Dec 15, 2017

Distinguished Scholars Including Larry Summers and Adair Turner Present Evidence of the Trend and Policy Solutions

Reawakening

From the Origins of Economic Ideas to the Challenges of Our Time

Event Conference #INET2017 | Oct 21–23, 2017

INET gathered hundreds of new economic thinkers in Edinburgh to discuss the past, present, and future of the economics profession.